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communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. everyday saying "these are the finest and the freshest" and you're poring over the fish, picking them up and deciding "only this is good enough for my customers, my clientele." >> oh, of course, we are a very aware and we do buy the best and i think what makes a great rest vaunt the cooking also. of course the service, the ambience, and for that we buy the best, we don't wake up at 4:00 in the morning because we finished at midnight every night. but
bloomberg. he's the mayor of new york city and he's also the co-chair of mayors against illegal guns. he's long been an outspoken advocate of gun control. he is now call on the nation's lawmakers to make reducing gun violence their top priority. here's what he said earlier today at a city hall press conference. >> if the massacre in tucson wasn't enough to make our national leaders act, and if the more recent bloodshed in aurora, colorado, and oak creaks wisconsin, and portland oregon and other cities and towns wasn't enough, perhaps the slaughter of innocence at sandy hook elementary school will at long last be enough. millions of americans hope that is true. but it's not enough for us to hope. we have to speak up. we have made our voices heard and hold washington accountable for facing up to the epidemic of gun violence in our country. if this moment passes in to memory without action from washington, it will be a stain upon our nation's commitment to protecting the innocence innocent including our children. >> rose: i'm pleased to have mayor bloomberg back at this table. >> thank you
firefighters were killed as they responded to a blaze in upstate new york. the governor of new york state has called what happened in at the small town a senseless act of violence. it comes just 10 days after a shooting killed 26 people at a connecticut primary school. a report from washington. >> a fire in the early morning in a comfortable lakeside community. the phone call that brought forth small town firefighters to the blaze, and out of nowhere, a tragedy on christmas eve. >> all four firefighters were shot at the scene. one firefighter was able to flee the scene on his own, and the other three were p&l in the location. >> two firefighters died of their wounds at the fire, and it took an armored personnel carrier to evacuate residents. the town is distraught. >> it is a very difficult situation. >> a heightened awareness to this kind of violence in light of what happened in connecticut, and i just want everyone to remember that it is christmas eve. we have families who are in pain and crisis today. >> all week, they have been burying the dead in newtown, connecticut, and all week, the a
cliff. >>> the past year has been a record year for new york with less murders than any time than in the past 15 years. mayor michael bloomberg said there were just over 400 homicides in 2012, 100 less than in the previous year. one man knows a lot about that subject, new york city's deputy police commissioner, paul brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead o
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: british period dramas have long held a special fascination for american television audiences, upstairs, downstairs, pride and prejudice have been released to widespread attention and praise, downton abbey anybody the most successful and the latest, oscar-winning prize winner julian fellows already won six emmys and legions on fans on both sides of the pond. it is back on pbs in january and here is a teaser for the third season. >> from war and peace downton abbey still stands. >> no one must know. >> i am warning you. >> rose: joining me now, four of the stars, hugh bonneville, plays lord granderson familiar. >> elizabeth mcgovern. >> lady grantham. >> jim carter plays the butler and joanne greg plays anna, the head house made, i am proud to have all of you here. >> let me start and go around and tell me where you left your character and what to expect this year. >> the end of season 2. >> robert was relieved that the war and the spanish flu had deserted at long last and maybe he would get his home
board? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the new york stock exchange has been the symbol of capitalism for nearly two centuries, but now it wants to give up its independence and be bought by a little-known rival in atlanta. the intercontinental exchange, or "ice" for short, was started 12 years ago as an energy trading platform. since then, the exchange has evolved into an internet-based marketplace trading futures, options, and derivatives. the reason it wants to buy the n.y.s.e. is not the plain vanilla stock trading business. the jewel in the deal is a division called "liffe," a leading futures and options exchange. it's based in london and drives over 40% of n.y.s.e. profits. >> it has a business that deals, for instance, in financial derivatives. these are derivatives contracts tied to financial products like interest rates, and ice has been wanting to expand in that direction for a while. >> reporter: as for the n.y.s.e., it's no secret that this year has been a tough one for the stock trading business. in addition, fewer companies are going public, so the i.p.o. market has dried
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: andy warhol is considered by many to be the most important artist of the 21st century, though critics and artist debate the meaning of his work, few question his impact on contemporary art. this is the subject of of the metropolitan musician exhibition called "regarding warhol: 60 artists, 50 years." it showcases 45 works by warhol alongside 1200 works by 60 other artists influenced by him. joining me are two curators, mark rosenthal and marla prather. also are three of the artists featured in the show: jeff koons john currin and my good friend chuck close. i'm pleased to have all of them here at this table. let me start with you, mark. somebody once said to me great books begin with a question. do great exhibitions begin with a question? >> well, that's what i hope. the question here is, is andy warhol the most impactful artist? >> rose: impactful rather than important? >> i prefer that. i prefer that because i think of his effect being like a meteor hitting the earth and changing climact
. >> in new york, the number of murders has gone down from 2400 a year, 20 years ago, to under 400 now. it's 300. a big part of that, in my judgment, what has been introduced in new york city, stop and frisk, where the police are allowed to go ahead, look at somebody who they consider suspicious, check and see whether the man has a gun, and that has really made a difference in terms of what's happened in new york. it's not the only thing but one of those factors. interestingly enough, 91% of the people would are shot are people from the minority communities. so they're the ones who are the most -- sadly to stay, one who get the worst of it, the brunt of it. so this is something that i think is absolutely critical in terms of getting gun control across the united states and diminishing the amount of murders. >> but tough same -- you had the same gun law, didn't you, when you had 2400 killed as 400 killed? >> no, we did not. >> you had a new gun law? >> stop and frisk -- >> i'm not talking about stop and frisk. i'm talking gun show -- >> hold on. >> the gun show loophole allows people to sel
on the fiscal cliff in janaury. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from grandma's cookies to holiday gifts for the little ones, still ahead we're riding along with u.p.s. as the shipping giant kicks off its busiest week of the year. >> tom: two mildly encouraging words were used by a group of economists to describe what next year may bring: stable and moderate. that's the 2013 outlook from the national association of business economics. the organization figures the u.s. economy will grow 2.1%, driven by housing and construction, but with corporate profit growth slowing down. nayantara hensel is the chairman of the national association for business economics. not bad, moderate, stable but certainly not robust here s it? >> no, that's absolutely right, tom. basically again we're forecasting annual average real gdp growth at 2.1% but the good news is we expect it to accelerate during the course of the year, perhaps reach being 3% by the fourth quarter of 2014. >> tom: what is going to add to that growth considering, is it being held back in the first six months because of the uncertaint
online. in new york, police say the man who shot the two volunteer firefighters on monday in upstate new york before killing himself had left a note saying he wanted to do what he liked best, killing people. william spengler had serious health problems and was carrying three guns. his older sister, cheryl, who he reportedly hated is missing. jag klugman passed, age 90. he trained himself to speak again and returned to acting in the 1990's. it is the 40th anniversary of the bombing of hanoi. american bombers pounded large parts of northern vietnam. over 20,000 tons of explosives were dropped and over 1,000 vet noah meeze were killed. >> you are watching "bbc world news." these are the headlines. egypt's new constitution is approved by more than 60% of voters who took part in the referendum. queen elizabeth has praised the volunteers who helped stage the diamond jubilee celebrations as well as the olympics and paraolympics. on the same day pope benedict prayed for piece in nigeria, gunmen struck at a service in the north. the attackers opened fire at midnight mass. an islamist group has ta
, but it is his record that won him the person of the year award. i spoke to the international editor in new york. does obama's new america include gun control do you think? >> i think it does. what is interesting is in his first administration he presided over three mass shootings, and it is one issue he avoided. i think because the children were so young he was visibly moved. i think there has been a radical shift in policy, and what was basically a forgotten issue has moved to the forefront for the second term. i think it is a real change. >> not everyone will agree with your choice. what criteria do you use when you make your pick? >> the basic person is the person or persons who have most influenced world events over the previous year and stand the best chance of doing so over the year ahead, so there were a lot of viable candidates. there was a pakistani girl who was shot by the taliban, hamas mursi.nd more se -- a lot of people think the u.s. president is a boring choice, but we evaluated it on the merits, and we think the 2012 election is more significant than the 2008 election, which is
count. what has that space -- being away from the rat race, not being in new york, not being in l.a., what has the solitude done for your songwriting? >> i think it can only have made it better. i think i am stimulated to right by the turmoil of the city, by the confusion and problems, but i am also nearest by the solitude, the closest to the nature region the closeness to nature. people say, what does wilderness mean when you are starving? i get that, but i also does not mean to destroy the wilderness, because when you are not starving you are going to want a place to go and your kids and grandkids are going to want a place to go, so i see it as my responsibility to take care of the problems in the city, but to take care of the wilderness for future generations. we have to. tavis: the love you have given is boundless, and i am glad to have you on this program. this is so unfair to have our life so rich you cannot even scratched the surface. there is a book you can pick up. it is called "a natural woman, written by the one and only carole king. the timing of this is a beautiful th
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. it is estimated that one in five american veterans in these wars suffer from severe depression or post traumatic stress disorder. retired lieutenant colonel john o blin is one of them. he served four tours in iraq and surrounding persian gulf as well as three tours on the-- tours on the border of israel and egypt, awarded the bronze star, purple heart and kbrat action badge among other commendationses. he joins me tonight to talk about his life, also joining me an extraordinary group of scien titss, mary stein from california san diego, lisa shin from tufts university, kerry russler from emory university, joann difede from cornell and my cohost is dr. eric kandel. a noubl lawyer yet, professor at columbia university and a howard hughes medical investigator. i am pleased to have all of them here this evening at this table. which begin as we always do talking to eric kandel. what are we doing this evening. >> post traumatic stress disorder. this is a fascinating disorder. and it is unique in psychiatry. it is perhaps the only p
.b.r.," washington. >> susie: the threat of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the auto industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy automobiles. but my fear is that could change dramatically. >> susie: steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making captain investments. i see that particularly in the building side. from my standpoint, i continue to invest around the world. i'll invest to make sure i'm buying the strategies we laid up for
rick karr reports on the polluted waters that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working conditions in bangladesh, where more than 100 workers have died over the past month. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama made another foray outside washington today, trying t
, a contributor to forbes.com and former detroit bureau chief for the "new york times," and by bill ballenger, editor of "inside michigan politics." welcome to you both. mickey maynard. first, this has all happened very quickly. what precipitated this right now. >> there were two things that happened, judy. first of all in november there was a ballot proposal that unions floated that would have outlawed right-to-work. it would have put that into the state constitution. that proposal failed because it was proposed at the same time as a lot of constitutional amendments. people just sort of cast one vote against all of them. the second thing that happened was republicans gave up some seats in the house and senate. it will still be a republican majority in january but it will be smaller. if right-to-work was going to happen this lame duck republican-controlled legislature was where it was going to happen. >> woodruff: bill, in a state that voted by ten points for president obama in november, it's a state that is striking a blow for right-to-work. how do you explain that? >> there was a mixeded re
in 1932 -- in korea in 1932. when the north invaded, he and his family fled to japan. but in new york at the epicenter of new technology and ideas, that eventually became his home. and at a time when people were not expected to interact with technology, he invited participation. >> we have his random access, which shows the artist having read -- the constructed a real to real audio decker he invites the audience to interact with the trucks on our own with the device. >> why did he do this? and how is it relevant today? >> he was the first artist to the construct technology and give it back to west. it is a metaphor for what we're going through today with the internet and the technology that we deal with on a day-to-day basis. >> he knew that television would change the world. and his art embraces it, sometimes playfully, sometimes obscure. he defined a new visual medium that is now at the center of our to the 21st century. he was really the first person to use technology in ways that today, we take for granted. he predicted the power of television, how electronic media could bring us
, exactly. so to you let's go to the defense of marriage act case. and this came out of new york. first of all explain how the defense of marriage act worked and how did this one case involving an 83-year-old woman in edie wind sore-- windsor raise the issue. >> well, the challenge here is to a provision in the defense of marriage act, section 3. and that defines for all federal purposes marriage is between one man and one womanment and by doing that it affects more than a thousand federal laws, everything from tax laws to social security and health and welfare benefits. the defense of marriage act was challenged by edie windsor from new york. she had a partner for over 40 years. they were married in 2007 in canada, a new york recognized their marriage when miss windsor's partner, her spouse died. her spouse left her entire estate to edie windsor. because of the defense of marriage act edie windsor was left with almost a 400,000 dollar federal estate tax that someone who was the spouse of an opposite sex coup weill not have had to pay. so their defense of marriage act can being challeng
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city
and ohio. to the northeast, more than a foot of snow was expected from new york state to maine. by last night, it was already on the way. >> the winds were fierce it was blowing the cars around and you could see the semi's were swerving. >> ifill: the storm also forced cancellation of hundreds of flights and the ripple effects reached as far west as san francisco. >> after i found out my flight had been canceled after four hours of waiting in the airport, i had to wait another three hour customer service line, which i didn't even get to the end of before the booth closed. >> ifill: about a 1,000 people spent christmas night on cots at dallas/fort worth international airport. by dawn, patience was wearing thin. one fed-up pilot apologized to his passengers over the loudspeaker, after they were forced to wait on the tarmac for almost five hours. >> ifill: by this evening, the worst of the weather was moving into new england. but in its wake, nearly 200,000 customers had lost power across the southeast and midwest, making home for the holidays unexpectedly cold and dark. >> warner: still t
pratt, nbr, new york. >> susie: when it comes to new claims for jobless benefits, the effects of super storm sandy appear to be passing. new claims fell by 25,000 in the week ending december 1 to a lower than expected 370,000 requests. that's raising hopes about november's jobs data, which is due out tomorrow. grey, and christmas says u.s. employment firm challenger, grey, and christmas says u.s. companies announced 57,000 job cuts last month. separately, the number of planned job cuts rose 20% in november from october's levels. on wall street, the dow rose 39 points, but the nasdaq added 15, the s&p up nearly five. >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. coming up tonight, we'll talk to the c.e.o. of kitchen store sur la table and get his outlook for holiday sales. >> tom: lots of theatrics today, but few visible signs of progress in washington towards a fix for the fiscal cliff. the only hopeful sign is that republicans and democrats are talking privately again. but they haven't worked out any of the big issues, including what to do about the nation's debt limit. washington will h
in new york. it made niemeyer's mainame. in 1996 he received -- in 1956 he received the commission of a lifetime. he was asked to design the capitol building in brazil. the buildings he produced and became instant icons and an inspiration to the next generation of architects. >> he was an influence on my becoming an architect so long ago. and he was just incredibly creative until the end. his passion was architecture, but his passion was life. that is why he lived so long. >> the 1964 military coup in brazil led to the openly communist niemeyer leading to live in paris. he returned some years later and ensure the before his 90th birthday produced this. the museum of contemporary art. a spectacular masterpiece. oscar niemeyer never stopped working, were stopped believing that architecture could make the world a better place. which most would agree in his case, it did. >> finally tonight, this incredible new view of our planet. these images were captured by a nasa satellite traveling some 800 kilometers above earth. the satellite is usually used for looking at weather events. as you
with correspondent david of the new york times. it seems it is overflowing with crisis of the moment. now you have egypt and syria. where can the administration exert influence? >> there is not a lot of influence they can exert right now. i think they believe there is probably a tipping. at this moment and they are doing whatever they can to push him out and you heard secretary clinton talk about that. but they have some concerns, not only about whether he leaves, but what happens as he goes. the question at least asked, but it is being asked in this case, then what? and the biggest concern is the chemical weapons because if they fell into the wrong hands, al qaeda and affiliates, has block, others, and you could have a problem that could spread. i think the question is, does it in code or exploited? >> you have written about how the use of chemical weapons it seems to be shifting. why is that happening? >> in august, president obama said his calculus would change if the chemical weapons were moved or if they were used. this week, we have heard many warnings against using them. it appears some hav
to new york or there has been an outcome in a sexual assault case involving dominique strauss-kahn. the former imf chief was accused of rape, but he has avoided an embarrassing jury trial by reaching a financial settlement. >> absolutely nothing at all. the judge said the terms of the settlement or confidential. we do not know how much money was paid out to nafissatou diallo in order to avoid a trial. the criminal case collapsed last year because the prosecution decided that nafissatou diallo was not a credible witness. she insisted that she was the victim of attempted rape and the victim of violent sexual assault. she brought a civil case for damages against dominique strauss-kahn. that is an end to that side of it. >> a lot of people thinking, i would be very happy if i never heard anything about dsk again. >> he is trying to get charges in france drawn-out bear. there are charges that he was linked to a prostitution ring. he will try to get a judge dismissed those charges. it is an extraordinary case and we do not know what happened that morning in that hotel room in manhat
trying to wipe the slate clean. >> a brief time ago, i discussed the case in new york. are they turning a blind eye to this alleged money-laundering? >> i think what happened is that the company was involved in sinbad housekeeping. they were very neglectful to the point that systematically, for several years, they failed to keep a close eye on who they were doing business with. in particular, in the case of money coming in mexico into the united states, they did not really ask any questions about why why there would be so many transfers and cash. the flow of money kept increasing at a time when a number of people working in the compliance office was decreasing. separately, we saw examples of the bank stripping details for who these transfers of money were coming from, making it virtually impossible that in some cases were countries sanctioned by america. >> another british bank reaching a settlement, a similar claims in the case of transferring money such as iran and sudan. those involved were considerably less that that is why it was shocking in some sense, because the scale and how lo
. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. hi, neighbor! my grandpere is coming over to visit for thank you day. yay! and then we're going to have a thank you day party! thank you for coming over to play today. i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting,
much happened for a long time. jeff buckley comes to new york city and becomes the most buzz about young artist in 1992, 93. rediscovers -- he discovers "hallelujah" and entered it into his said. he died drowning in the mississippi river and this mythologies starts to grow around him and more and more people go back to his music and "hallelujah" becomes a real time epitaph for this tragic and figure. more and more artists started to cover it. everybody from willie nelson to katie lang to michael bolton. all kinds of people began to record the song. is very easy to be cynical that music does not mean as much as it used to, not as important as the ec to be. it can mean an incredible amount to a wide range of people. it is seen as this kind of sacred pop song and a modern hiymn. even when you suffer the pain and heartbreak of what life throws at you, you have to stand in wonder at a life and living. >> a haunting and them. how "hallelujah" became a global hit. we hope to see you back here tomorrow. until then, you can find constant updates on our website. for all of us here, thank you
from the gulf of mexico. it will bring more rain and snow, this time washington and new york could be hit as well. >> a wicket when to remix is wreaking havoc on the nation's midsection. -- a wicked winter remix is wreaking havoc on the nation's midsection. this has ruined plans for tens of thousands. the national weather service says the heaviest the commissions will be in northern pennsylvania. and parts of the northeast, they are taking the snow in stride. >> i love it. this is part of living in new england. >> standard new england weather. >> this is mostly bringing heavy rain and strong winds of up to 70 miles per hour. this is causing more problems for travelers. at least 355 have been cancelled today. in the last 24 hours, it has been more than 2400. power was knocked out from texas to vermont. people in ohio are trying to clean up the mess. from texas to alabama, at least 34 tornadoes touched down. today, people are picking up the debris. the death toll from the winter storm has risen. so far, at least nine people have been killed. >> there are police everywhere. >> police
time, i spoke to times editor at large. on wednesday, they join me from new york. the first collective, what do you make of him? >> is quite remarkable. tens of thousands of people are paying for his blood. he showed flashes of a sense of humor. third time magazine, the worst fears about a muslim brotherhood. they are not coming true. >> you interviewed him after he awarded himself these powers. >> the argument is that he is trying to protect democracy. >> they have tried to, in his words, undermine the democratic process. the courts would again interfere, dissolve the constitution that they have done once before. he understands the optics of this. a desire to be practical, he was being political. he would look to his countrymen as very dictatorial. i was impressed by how comfortable he was. he was a fairly even killed person. he might be a little more flustered and stiffer than usual. >> he seems to make this tactical error. the revolution is not at risk here? >> i believe that he certainly thinks that. as a president, he thinks he is doing what is in the best interests, and what is l
. tavis: how did new york harry bosch -- how did harry bosch become your guy? >> i think it is because he has a basic idea about fairness that connects to readers. everybody counts or nobody counts. it sounds pretty simple. it is an idealistic view of the world. it is hard to keep going. his efforts to always follow that code, i think -- he is certainly in daring to me because of that. hopefully, that is what translates to be who readers. -- to the readers. tavis: what is your approach, when you are addressing subject matter where race is at the epicenter, like these riot stucks -- like these riots? >> politics intrudes into investigation. harry is relentless, saying, what does politics have to do with justice? you suddenly have to build a story that touches on these things, but does not make any grand statements. i trust the readers to be smart enough to see what is going on, to have the internal discussions. is this the way we want to go? is is reflective of our society now? tavis: are there harry bosch's out there? is he a has been, or they never were? he is a figment of your imaginati
for bangladesh in new york. he preferred to keep his distance. >> i could have made billions by now, but i never thought of that. i wanted to keep the sanctity of music. >> two of his daughters became musicians. the jazz singer nora jones and a sitar player like her father. >> what is great about my relationship with him is we have a father daughter relationship. we have a teacher and student relationship and are also musical collaborators and perform together, so it is a very tight-knit, very close relationship. >> he was a man for whom music was part of an oral tradition handed down from two route to route. -- from guru to guru. and art with which she inspired musicians for 70 years. >> he died at the age of 92. he will be missed by music lovers around the world. that brings the program to a close. you can get updates on our web site. if you would like to reach me, you can follow me on a switcher. i will see you tomorrow. -- on twitter. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, a
. >> covering the week, reid wilson of "the hotline," david sanger of "the new york times," martha raddatz of abc news, and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factory. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our client through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management, from real estate to retirement solutions, we developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still. and that's o
, if the economy picks up sharply, riskier assets could become more attractive. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: more signs today that housing demand is picking up: the number of contracts signed to buy homes rose in november, to its best level in more than two years. the national association of realtors index of pending sales rose almost 10% last month. so will the housing market continue to recover in the new year? that's what tom hudson asked toll brothers chief financial officer marty connor. >> the housing market willcontig as done consumer confidence maintains or improfls. and a lot of that will be contingent on resolution of the fiscal cliff and the government and the economy. >> a lot of ways to measure thet but the most direct way for momentum home buyers and sellers is prices. do you expect that trajectory to continue? >> i do.we have raised prices ia little more than half of our communities. it's been relatively modest. but as we observe and we read stats, we are getting a lit lite more confident and may push prices a bit more in 2013. >> what are you finding in termg mater
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: master ricardo muti is here, one of the world's great conductors. he has lead some of the best orchestras including the vienna philharmonic, he is currently music director of the chicago symphony orchestra, critics and audiences alike have been dazzled and charmed by the intensity, the technique, the emotion that he and his musicians bring. here is a look at a performance of verdi's requiem. >> when you look at the journey of your life, from the violin, piano, goesing, conducting, is that the perfect sign of flow for someone who wants to lead a great orchestra? >> first i didn't want to be a musician. so the first quality, i mean the first, if you don't want something and you get it. and but i studied very seriously but fortunately-- . >> rose: what did you want to be, do. >> first my father was a medical doctor. we are five brothers. and he wanted one to be a doctor, one to be an architect, one to-- my profession was opposed to become a lawyer, that would have been a disast
brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that's more than the number of people who die from breast cancer and from auto accidents. it's a huge problem,
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